12/30/2007

Kamakura

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Enoshima, see below
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Kamakura 鎌倉

***** Location: Japan
***** Season: Non-seasonal Topic
***** Category: Humanity


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Explanation

CLICK for more Japanese photosCLICK for more English photos and links

Surrounded by mountains on three sides and the open water of Sagami Bay on the fourth, Kamakura is a natural fortress. During the Heian period it was the chief city of the Kantō region, and from the 12th through 14th centuries the Minamoto shoguns ruled Japan from here under what is known as the
Kamakura Shogunate (Kamakura Jidai, 鎌倉時代 1185–1333).

Kamakura is now mainly known for its temples and shrines. Kōtoku-in, with the monumental outdoor bronze statue of Amida Buddha, the most famous of these. A 15th Century tsunami destroyed the temple that once housed the Great Buddha, but the statue survived and has remained outdoors ever since.

Magnificent Zen temples like Kencho-ji and Engaku-ji; the Tokei-ji (a nunnery that was a refuge for women who wanted to divorce their husbands); the Tsurugaoka Hachiman Shrine; the Hase-dera, an ancient Kannon temple; the graves of Minamoto no Yoritomo and Hōjō Masako; and the Kamakura-gu where Prince Morinaga was executed, top the list of Kamakura's most famous historical and religious sites.

Kamakura has a beach which, in combination with the temples and the proximity to Tokyo, makes it a popular tourist destination. The city is well-provided with restaurants and other tourist-oriented amenities.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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Fujiwara no Kamatari (藤原釜足)

. The origins of the name Kamakura
The SICKLE (kama 鎌) and Haiku   

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Religious people love nature. Kamakuraites love flowers. No matter when you visit Kamakura, flowers are always with you. Many temples are famous for certain flowers.
(See haiku below.)
There is much to be said about the atmosphere of Kamakura and its attraction to haiku poets. I will try to add more later.

Gabi Greve

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Saint Nichiren 日蓮 and Kamakura


Kamakura Kaido 鎌倉街道
Kamakura Kaidō, Kamakura Highway or Highways during the Kamakura Period

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. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸 .



Kanda Kamakurachoo 神田鎌倉町
"Kamakura Village" in Kanda, Chiyoda ward
Kamakuragashi 鎌倉河岸 ー 鎌倉川岸
Kamakura riverbank, Kamakura waterfront


At the beginning of the Edo period, when the town was just re-structured by Tokugawa Ieyasu, a lot of construction wood and stones came via the Kamakura region (Sagami no kuni 相模国), with workers coming from Kamakura to heop unloaded at Kamakuragashi. The tradespeople built their homes nearby, soon called Kamakura village. In a map of 1657, it is mentioned as 「かまくら丁」.
Ieyasu also had the Koora ke 甲良家 Kora family from Omi settle here . The head of the Kora family was a master carpenter (daitooryoo 大棟梁) and helped build Edo castle, Senso-Ji and other famous temples, even the 日光東照宮 Nikko Toshogu shrine.



There are some legends alive in the village.
御宿稲荷神社 Mishuku Inari Jinja
浦安稲荷神社 Urayasu Inari Jinja
出世不動尊 Shusse Fudo
家康が関東の新領国を視察した際に、先発隊として来ていた家臣の家に宿をとりました。のちにその庭の祠が御宿稲荷として信仰されるようになり、幕府より家康の足跡を記念して社地を寄進されました。
昔、Shioiri 潮入りの葦原 (Ashihara)だったこのあたりで、漁業を営む人々が篤(あつ)い信仰を寄せていた「浦安稲荷神社」も、かつてはこの町にありました。この祠は、天保(てんぽう)十四年(1843年)に遷座(せんざ)され、現在は神田明神の境内にあります。
「出世不動尊」は、一橋(ひとつばし)徳川家の表鬼門除(おもてきもんよ)けとして祀(まつ)られていたといわれています。本尊は、平安時代の僧智証大師(ちしょうだいし)の作と伝えられています。不動尊前の「出世不動通り」は、当時毎月二十七日に縁日が開かれ、たいへんな盛況だったようです。
now 内神田二丁目1番
- source : Chiyoda Ward Tokyo -

One famous store in Kanda Kamakura Village was the sake store
Toshimaya 豊島屋 (としまや)
It begun selling some snacks and a cup of sake to the workers in the evening, thus being the first "Izakaya 居酒屋" pub in Edo.
Soon other yatai 屋台 food and drink stalls came up in many parts of Edo.



Since 1596 in Edo
Toshimaya, the oldest sake store in Tokyo, originated when its founder, 豊島屋十右衛門 Toshimaya Juemon, opened a sake store and tavern in 1596 at Kamakura Waterfront in central Edo (modern day Tokyo). At that time, large-scale renovation work was being carried out on Edo Castle, so people flocked to Kamakura Waterfront, and Toshimaya is said to have prospered enormously.

Furthermore, when Juemon began brewing shirozake (white sake), its reputation spread throughout Edo. Shirozake is a sweet rice liqueur that was popular with women at the time. Indeed, it was from this time that the Japanese custom of offering shirozake on Girls’ Day, the annual event during which people pray for girls’ healthy growth, is said to have begun. As a result, Toshimaya’s shirozake is cited in many novels and traditional Japanese Kabuki plays. Even today, Toshimaya preserves the traditional recipes and makes shirozake once a year.

Nowadays, our sake brewery is located in Higashi-Murayama City in west Tokyo, where sake, shirozake and mirin (sweet cooking sake) are brewed. Our sake, Kinkon (Golden Wedding Anniversary in English), has been awarded numerous gold prizes at the Annual Japan Sake Awards, and is used as the sacred sake at the famous Meiji Jingu Shrine as well as Kanda Myojin Shrine. Kinkon is skillfully produced by our brewers and, as one of Tokyo’s representative sakes, it brings value to many of our customers.
- source : toshimaya.co.jp -

. Edo - Kanda 神田 Kanda district .

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Saitama

Kami-Kumagaya Station (上熊谷駅 Kami-Kumagaya-eki) is a railway station on the Chichibu Main Line in Kumagaya, Saitama, Japan, operated by the private railway operator Chichibu Railway.
Kami-Kumagawa Station opened on 1 April 1933 as Kamakura-machi Station (鎌倉町駅).
It was renamed Kami-Kumagaya from 1 July 1933.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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. Takahama Kyoshi and Kamakura   

鎌倉の古き宿屋の松飾り
Kamakura no furuki yadoya no matsukazari

these pine decorations
at the old inns
of Kamakura


Kyoshi, 1949





. WKD : kadomatsu 門松 "pine at the entrance".


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Kamakura Beach and Enoden Train ... more photos


Susumsu Takiguchi about Hoshino Tsubaki sensei

Kamakura wa nami no oto yori ake yasushi

in Kamakura
dawn breaks from the sound of waves,
getting earlier and earlier

Kamakura is where Kyoshi lived and worked most of his life after leaving his hometown, Matsuyama. Tsubaki and her son, Takashi, have founded a haiku
museum there in honor of Kyoshi and of Tsubaki's mother, Tatsuko. The museum
has become a center of haiku studies and composition. As the haiku indicates, residents of this coastal town are always conscious of the sea.
Kyoshi founded a new haiku magazine, Tamamo, and gave it to Tatsuko to run.
Now it is run by Tsubaki and Takashi.


More about: Hoshino Tsubaki and
Takahama Kyoshi and Kamakura

鎌倉虚子立子記念館

Kamakura Haiku by Kyoshi

鎌倉は古き都や注連の内

鎌倉を驚かしたる余寒あり

早春の鎌倉山の椿かな

鎌倉に實朝忌あり美しき

鎌倉の山に響きて花火かな

鎌倉や牡丹の根に蟹遊ぶ

鎌倉の草庵春の嵐かな

鎌倉に春の雪降る訃いたる

Haiku by Kyoshi about Kamakura



CLICK for more photos

His Grave at Jufukuji 寿福寺, Kamakura


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Tsukioka Yoshitoshi - 東海道由比ヶ浜


Yuigahama 由比ガ浜 Yuigahama Beach
"beach at Yui"
. . . CLICK here for Photos !


短夜や足跡浅き由比が濱
mijikayo ya ashiato asaki Yuigahama

short night -
shallow footprints
at Yuigahama


Yosa Buson

. Short Night and HAIKU  


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- - - - - Enoshima 江ノ島

Benzaiten, the goddess of music and entertainment, is enshrined on the island.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !



江ノ島や傘さしかけし夏肴
Enoshima ya kasa sashikakeshi natsu sakana

Enoshima island !
all use a parasol -
fish in summer

Takebe Soochoo 建部巣兆
1761-1814, painter and poet, Takebe Socho

. FISH in summer - SAIJIKI

. Benten, Benzaiten 弁天 弁財天








Enoshima - by Katsushika Hokusai




Travelers at Enoshima - by Kitagawa Utamaro

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Worldwide use

CLICK for original Link

Obama revisits Kamakura's Great Buddha
November 15, 2010



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Things found on the way


Kamakura Sayumi, a Haiku Poet
Sayumi Kamakura 鎌倉佐弓




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HAIKU


Issa in Kamakura

蛤や在鎌倉の雁鴎
hamaguri ya zai-kamakura no kari kamome

O clams
meet the geese and gulls
of Greater Kamakura!




春雨やかまくら雀何となく
harusame ya kamakura suzume nan to naku

in spring rain
Kamakura's sparrow's...
how they sing!




かまくらや昔どなたの千代椿
kamakura ya mukashi donata no chiyo tsubaki

Kamakura--
who planted this camellia
in olden times?




かまくらや犬にも一ッ御なん餅
kamakura ya inu ni mo hitotsu o-nan mochi

in Kamakura
one for the dog...
sacred rice cakes


This haiku refers to a celebration held on the 12th day of Ninth Month. Rice cakes in bean jam are offered to Nichiren, the founder of one of Japan's major Buddhist sects. These offerings commemorate a time when an old woman fed Nichiren when he was in exile.




しぐるるや在鎌倉雁かもめ
shigururu ya imasu kamakura kari kamome

winter rain falls
on Kamakura's residents...
geeses, gulls





鎌倉や今はかがしの屋敷守
Kamakura ya ima wa kagashi no yashiki mori

Kamakura--
these days scarecrows
are the gatekeepers


Kobayashi Issa / Tr. David Lanoue

CLICK for original LINK


栄華は昔、今年豊作
the prosperity is the past
and the best harvest this year


© Haiga and Renku : Nakamura Sakuo

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Kamakura ya Zen to haiku ni ume kaori

plum blossoms
adorning Zen and haiku
at Kamakura asile


Masaaki Oka

Plum-view haiku walk to Tokeiji Temple (woman-escaping-to-Temple) in Kamakura.

More Kamakura Haiku, 2005
Moderator: Catherine Urquhart


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Gabi Greve:
I lived in Kamakura from 1977 till 1995.
I was member of a local haiku group for many years.




鎌倉や観光客の夏の陣
Kamakura ya kankookyaku no natsu no jin

Oh Kamakura !
the "Battle of Summer"
of the tourists

"FACTS : Osaka natsu no jin" (the Summer battle of Osaka)

Every year, there were more noisy visitors coming to town to visit temples and shrines, with roads crowded by smelly tourist buses, the beach filled with people (and waste and leftovers next morning)... after about 15 years it was time for us to move on to the quiet mountains of Okayama !



a different temple
for each season <>
flowers of Kamakura


Flower Calendar in Kamakura


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Related words


. Asaina Kiridoshi Pass 朝夷奈切通し .
and Asahina Saburo Yoshihide - 朝比奈三郎義秀


Hoshino Tsubaki 星野 椿
Granddaughter of Takahama Kyoshi
 


. Tsurugaoka Hachimangu
鶴岡八幡宮 and Hachiman Festivals




. Kamakurabori 鎌倉彫り
Kamakura Laquerware and Daruma san
 


Amulets from temples in Kamakura :
. Folk Toys from Kanagawa .

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my giant old friend
has taken a final fall ...
spring storm


. The Old Gingko Tree at Hachimangu
uprooted in March, 2010
 

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12/28/2007

Onomatopoetic Words - Repetition

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Onomatopoetic Words

and repetition, see below



平安神宮 at shrine Heian jingu in Kyoto


はらはらと
はらはらはらと
桜かな

harahara to
harahara hara to
sakura kana

fluttering
more fluttering
cherry blossoms


- Shared by Taro Aizu -
Joys of Japan, 2012


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quote:
There are a lot of Japanese haiku using onomatopoeic words or mimetic words.
I think it's hard to translate these haiku.

For example

mizu-makura gabari to samui umi ga aru

Saito Sanki

gabari to: mimetic word, "gabari to" is an unusual word.

Maybe Sanki made a new word. But I can feel suddenness from the sound of "gabari to".

The situation of this haiku is ( in my imagination) :
Sanki had a high fever, so he slept using a water pillow. There were several pieces of ice in it. Sanki was half conscious. When pieces of ice made a low sound, he felt as if he were in a cold sea ( with icebergs ).

The mimetic/onomatopoeic word "gabari to" has the power to make me imagine the above situation.
Perhaps there is no word in English like "gabari to".
Of course, there must be a lot of English mimetic/onomatopoeic words not to be translated into Japanese words.
© Hiromi / Shiki Archives 1998



Adjectives are frequently used in Japansese haiku, as they fit each situation.
See KERORI below for translation problems.


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In English as in Japanese, onomatopoetic words are those that imitate natural sounds. In Japanese, however, there are literally hundreds of such words, and they are used much more frequently than in English. Words that represent actual sounds (e.g., animal noises) are called giseigo, while words that refer specifically to actions (e.g., to drink with a gulp or to drink sip by sip) are called gitaigo.

Read more HERE !

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Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomateopoeia or onomatopœia) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", "slurp", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the Greek words όνομα (onoma, = "name") and ποιέω (poieō, = "I make" or "I do") thus it essentially means "name creation".

doki doki (ドキドキ): the (speeding up of the) beating of a heart (and thus excitement).
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !



bara bara / giri giri
WKD: Some Japanese Onomatopoetic Words


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CLICK for original LINK
ONOMATOPOETIC ENGLISH-JAPANESE DICTIONARY


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Hototogisu, little cuckoo
This is an onomatopoetic word for the bird's call.

Little Cuckoo, C. poliocephalis, hototogisu ホトトギス, 時鳥
kigo for all summer

In 1898 Takahama Kyoshi became the editor of Hototogisu, a magazine of haiku that was started by Shiki.
“Hototogisu” (Japanese literary magazine)

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a house centipede; a galley worm
gejigeji 蚰蜒 (げじげじ)


kigo for all summer

geji, げじ、
big geji, oogeji 大蚰蜒(おおげじ)

Millipede, centipede, mukade,


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Compiled by Larry Bole
(Translating Haiku Forum)

Here is the url for a list of "Japanese Sound effects and what they mean," which is useful in attempting to understand manga:
http://www.oop-ack.com/manga/soundfx.html


Blyth discusses onomatopoeia in "Haiku," Vol. 1, "Eastern Culture," "Section V The Technique of Haiku, 4. Onomatopoeia."

To summarize:

According to Blyth, "of all languages, Japanese is by far the richest in onomatopoeic elements..."

Blyth identifies three types of onomatopoeia:
"(a) The direct representation of the sounds of the outside world by the sound of the voice. ...
(b) The representation of movement, or physical sensation other than that of sound. ...
(c) The representation of soul states. ..."

Blyth quotes the following examples:

(a)
Ochikochi ochikochi to utsu kinuta kana.

Here and there,
There and here,
Beating fulling-blocks.

Buson


Ichi boku to poku poku aruku hanami kana

He ambles along
With his man-servant:
Cherry-blossom viewing.

Kigin


Butsudan ni honzon kaketa ka hototogisu

"Is the main image
Set on the altar?"
Cries the hototogisu.

Soukan - Sookan - Sokan



(b)
Ishikawa wa kawarari inazuma sarari kana.

The Stony River rippling,
The lightning
Flickering--

Issa


Yusa-yusa to haru ga yuku zo yo nobe no kusa.

Spring departs,
Trembling, in the grasses
of the fields.

Issa


(c)
Hito chirari konoba mo chirari horari kana.

People are few,
Leaves also fall
Now and then.

Issa


Utagauna ushio no hana mo ura no haru.
(Blyth says in a footnote, "notice the u's, and a's.")

Do not doubt it,
The bay has its spring too,--
The flowers of the tide.


. utagau na ushio no hana mo ura no haru .


Osoki hi no tsumorite touki mukashi kana.

Slow days passing, accumulating,--
How distant they are,
The things of the past!

Buson


Osoki hi ya kodama kikoyuru kyou no sumi.

The slow day;
Echoes heard
In a corner of Kyoto.

Buson


After giving these examples, Blyth goes on to say:

"We should remind ourselves once more of Basho's advice to his disciples:

'Repeat (your verses) a thousand times on your lips.'

Haiku, no less than waka, are songs; they are meant to be read aloud, and repeated aloud. Onomatopoeia is not a matter of the eye, though it may help; the full and perfect meaning of a haiku is not realized until it is heard by the physical ear."


Here is another (well-known) haiku taken from another part of Blyth's discussion of onomatopoeia:

Haru no umi hinemosu notari notari kana

The spring sea,
Gently rising and falling,
The whole day long.

Buson


I would say this is an example of (b).

In "The Haiku Handbook," Higginson reiterates Blyth, adding his own thoughts, and also discusses the visual aspect of onomatopoeia (see the book's index).

Joan Giroux, in her book, "The Haiku Form," also discusses onomatopoeia. She gives some of what she describes as "innumerable repetitious and onomatopoeic words" in the Japanese language, such as "'perapera' (fluently), 'pikapika' (shiny), 'pachipachi' (crackling), 'pakapaka' (galloping), 'parapara' (patter), 'wakuwaku' (nervously), [and] 'tsurutsuru' (slippery)--all of which are used to great advantage in haiku."

Ms. Giroux gives one Japanese example of onomatopoeia in haiku:

馬ぼくぼく我を絵に見る夏野哉
Uma hokuhoku Ware wo e ni miru Natsu-no kana
uma bokuboku ware o e ni miru natsu-no kana

I find myself in a picture
The cob ambles slowly
Across the summer moor.


Staying in Kaii province, admiring the horses in the summer of 1685 . . .
. Matsuo Basho 松尾芭蕉 - Archives of the WKD .


More LINKS and thoughts on the subject
Larry Bole, Translating Haiku



hokuhoku ほくほく - (various meanings)

ほくほくと霞んで来るはどなた哉
hoku-hoku to kasunde kuru wa donata kana

rap-a-tap
who's that coming
in the mist?

Tr. Lanoue



who is it
walking slowly closer
out in the mist?

Tr. Chris Drake

This hokku comes from a letter Issa sent in the 2nd or 3rd month of 1813 to the anthology editor and haikai poet Fujimori Sobaku, who lived in Suwa, not too far from Issa. The hokku is a slight revision of one in Issa's diary for the 2nd month (March) of 1813, soon after Issa had concluded an agreement on 1/26 in his hometown with his half-brother concerning the division of his father's estate. It's tempting to read this hokku as Issa listening to his own footsteps gradually coming closer to him through the mountain mist in his hometown, where he hopes to settle down in the future, but it could be a naturalistic hokku about an uncanny experience in thick mountain mist. Issa uses a polite form for "who," so he does not seem to be afraid of the approaching person. The first version uses even more honorific language, so it's possible Issa may wonder if a bodhisattva such as Jizo or Kannon could possibly be out in the mist. It's left up to the reader to guess who or what kind of being the footsteps belong to.

For the meaning of the adverb modifying the verb, I follow Maruyama Kazuhiko (Seventh Diary 1.343) and various Japanese dictionaries. This was a very common meaning in Issa's time, though the meaning of hoku-hoku to (also boku-boku to) changes if it becomes hoku-hoku and is accompanied by tsue, as in one hokku by Issa.

Chris Drake


. Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 in Edo .

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Matsuo Basho 松尾芭蕉
. WKD : Onomatopoetic Words used by Basho .

Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶
. WKD : Onomatopoetic Words used by Issa .

Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村
. WKD : Onomatopoetic Words used by Buson .


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Repetition 繰り返し kurikaeshi

Repetition can be used to emphasize the mood of a haiku.
It must be skillfully applied to create a special effect not possible without it.


松島やああ松島や松島や

Matsushima ya
aa Matsushima ya
Matsushima ya



attributed to Kyoka-Writer Monk Tahara Bo



quote
"Repetition - For Meaning and Melody"
Florence Vilen (Sweden)

Among all poetical forms the haiku is the very soul of brevity. In no more than three lines it contains a maximum of seventeen syllables, often fewer. Every word, every break counts. Yet there are haiku that have space for repetition within this narrow frame. How then is this achieved?

It goes without saying that in order to work it must be done with considerable skill, or sensitivity. It may used for quite different poetical reasons, however.

By its very element of surprise repetition of a word or part of a phrase may make the readers pay greater attention. They may feel that in order to be understood the text as it stands calls for reading aloud. Now recitation of poetry is an excellent
practice which has been neglected in these years of silent reading due to general literacy. A poem worth reading is worth reciting, and will gain by it. Often the word which is repeated changes its sense to some degree. This will encourage the reader to savour its complete range of meaning. This effect is particularly striking when different forms of the same verb are used.

A word may create a definite anticipation that is then twisted to a surprise. Some haiku are written in an elusive style which it would be difficult to render into exact prose. By the repetition of words the reader is encouraged to shift them around and consider various possible interpretations of the scene. In other haiku the text may be perfectly clear and the repetition will serve as an exclamation, an expression of the sense of wonder. A scene will be compressed. A single word is used where normally a full description would be needed.

The repetition will show the reader the value of the word that has been chosen and the richness of meaning within its range.

with many examples

REPETITION CAN INCREASE THE IMPACT OF A HAIKU

source : www.tempslibres.org

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けふもけふも同じ山見て春の雨
kyoo mo kyoo mo onaji yama mite haru no ame

today too, today too
I see the same old mountain ...
rain in spring


Kobayashi Issa
Tr. Gabi Greve



鳴よ鳴よ親なし雀おとなしき
nake yo nake yo oya nashi suzume otonashiki

sing, sing!
orphan sparrow...
so quiet


Kobayashi Issa
Tr. David Lanoue



さくらさくらと唄れし老木哉
sakura sakura to utawareshi oiki kana

"Cherry blossoms! Cherry blossoms!"
they sang
under this old tree

Kobayashi Issa
Tr. David Lanoue

Sakura Sakura is the title of the most famous cherry blossom song.

. . . . .

- - - - - another one by Issa

くよくよとさわぐな翌は翌の露
kuyo-kuyo to sawagu na asu wa asu no tsuyu

The Japanese is 5 7 5, short long short
with NA as a cut marker in the middle of line 2

ku yo ku yo to
sa wa gu na a su wa
a su no tsu yu

This is a lot harder to translate if trying to keep the form of the original.


don't complain
so much - tomorrow brings
tomorrow's drewdrops

Tr. Gabi Greve


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雪山も雪なき山も似し高さ
yukiyama mo yuki naki yama mo nishi takasa

Mountains with snow
and mountains without snow
all the same height


. . . . .


野の果と空の果合ふ鳥雲に
no no hate to sora no hate au tori kumo ni

Where fields
and sky end
birds head north

(Comment by Gabi:
the repetition of NO HATE is not reflected in the translation.)

. . . . .


kyoo nanimo kamo nanimo kamo haru rashiku

Today
Everything, everywhere
says spring

It was a splendid warm day. The gentle sunlight made everyone happy. Winter's cold had come to an end, and suddenly it was spring. When young, I considered haiku as a means to obediently express that joy, and perhaps this poem marks my starting point. When we open our hearts and observe nature, nature speaks to us.
In this poem, I welcomed spring with my whole being.

source : HIA - Inahata Teiko
Co-translations by Kinuko & Richard JAMBOR




. WKD : Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 .

菜畠やひょいひょいひょいや菊の花
nabatake ya hyoi-hyoi-hyoi ya kiku no hana
na-batake ya hyoi hyoi hyoi ya kiku no hana

canola field --
a chrysanthemum, another
and another

Tr. Chris Drake

This hokku is from the 8th intercalary month (October) in 1824, the month after Issa was divorced (after a very short marriage) by his second wife on 8/3 and spent the next four months with some of his students in the vicinity. On intercalary 8/1, the next month, the dazed Issa lost his ability to speak for a while (he communicated by writing), so Issa was on the road and may not have been able to speak when he wrote this hokku.

Issa seems to be standing beside a field of canola plants that have been planted mainly for their seeds, which will become canola oil. The bright yellow flowers have finished blooming long ago, and in a few weeks the green plants will be harvested. They have large leaves, which, along with the stems, will be eaten. Issa seems to be fascinated by the way wild chrysanthemums are able to grow and bloom in the midst of the rather space-consuming canola plants. Here and there the chrysanthemums have managed to find spots with enough air and sunlight to be able to put out their flowers.

Issa manages to find one and then another and then, soon, he's spotted quite a few. As they suddenly come into view one after the other, perhaps they unconsciously remind him of the hidden words which temporarily refuse to come out of his own mouth. The canola plants have lost the Pure Land-like radiance of their flowers, but perhaps the chrysanthemums are suggesting a little of the field's earlier otherworldly luminescence. Issa actually worried about whether Amida could hear him repeat Amida's name only in his mind, without actually uttering it, so perhaps he finds solace in the way the hidden chrysanthemums keep appearing here and there.

Mustard seeds and mustard seed oil are pungent and distinctly different from canola or rapeseed oil, though the flowers are quite similar, so unfortunately I couldn't use "mustard field" for this commercial field of canola plants.

Chris Drake

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次の雪次の雪降りつもる    
tsugi no yuki tsugi no yuki furitsumoru

more snow
more snow
accumulating


Mizumi Hisao 水見壽男



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つばめつばめ泥が好きなる燕かな 
tsubame tsubame doro ga suki naru tsubame kana

Swallows, oh, swallows,
how much you like the mud!
you swallows!
tr. Kageyama Noriko

Hosomi Ayako 細見綾子


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snow is falling
on millions of homes
snow is falling


Taro Kunugi, Japan
facebook Feb. 12, 2011


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the river
the river makes
of the moon


Jim Kacian, 1996
source : kacian.gendaihaiku.com


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bettari  べったり 


丸く寝た犬にべったり小てふ哉
maruku neta inu ni bettari kochoo kana

totally at rest
on a dog curled up asleep --
small butterfly

Tr. Chris Drake

The onomatopoetic word bettari is hard to translate, because English doesn't have the wide array of delicate sensation and feeling gradations found in the numerous adverbial and adjectival onomatopoetic expressions found in Japanese (and Korean).
. Comment by Chris Drake .


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honobono, hono-bono ほのぼの - 仄仄 tender feeling
especially at daybreak. dimly, faintly. heartwarming (of a story)

初雪やほのぼのかすむ御式台
. hatsu yuki ya hono-bono kasumu Go-Shikidai .
Kobayashi Issa in Kyoto,Nijoo-joo 二条城 Nijo-Jo Castle



ほのぼのとはららご飯に炊きこまれ
. honobono to hararagohan ni takikomare .  
Oono Rinka 大野林火 enjoying some cooked rice with salmon roe



. matsu tatete sora honobono to akuru kado .
Natsume Soseki enjoys the pines at the gate



honobono to ariake no tsuki no tsukikage ni
momiji fukiorosu yamaoroshi no kaze

Dimly, dimly,
in the faint pool of moonlight
shadowing the dawn,
red leaves come fluttering down
in a gust of wind from the hills.

Tr. Paul S. Atkins

Murmured Conversations:
A Treatise on Poetry and Buddhism by the Poet-Monk Shinkei
source : muse.jhu.edu/journals - Paul S. Atkins -


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Roly poly Daruma of papermachee


Daruma and Japanse Culture


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HAIKU


. WKD : Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 .

風のおち葉ちょいちょい猫が押へけり
kaze no ochiba choi-choi neko ga osaekeri

barely moving
the cat nails it --
windblown leaf

Tr. Chris Drake


This winter hokku is from the 10th month (November) of 1815, when Issa was traveling around to see various haijin and students in the area east of Edo. The cat seems to be outside. With no wasted motion or forethought, it reaches out and lightly but firmly puts a paw precisely down on one of the fast-moving brown leaves blowing helter-skelter across the ground. Issa seems to be impressed by its spontaneity and naturalness combined with great accuracy.

I take choi-choi to be an adverb here that means 'slightly, barely, lightly, without thinking.' Three hokku later Issa uses a similar adverb, choi-to, that means virtually the same thing:

neko no ko ga choi-to osaeru ochiba kana

lightly stopped
by the kitten's paw
a fallen leaf


The only other time Issa uses choi-choi in his hokku is in a hokku from the 4th month (May) of 1816. Here it's clearly an adverb:

kawahori no choi-choi detari kome-hisago

barely moving
a bat comes out
of a rice gourd


In his house in his hometown Issa heard a bat crying inside an empty gourd used for carrying rice, and in this hokku the lost and perhaps fearful bat emerges very slowly, in an unthreatening way. In this context "barely moving" gains still another meaning.

The phrase choi-choi was also an exclamation of praise resembling "Bravo! Bravo!" and it was often followed by a to marking quotation with the verbs 'to praise; to say.' Without to, it tended to come after the praised thing or was followed by a break (ya or the end of a clause).

The first line has 6 syllables. This might be intended to suggest the unruliness of the leaves blowing in the wind.

Chris Drake
Translating Haiku Forum, January 2013



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Yosa Buson (1716-1783)

をちこちに滝の音聞く若ばかな
ochikochi ni taki no oto kiku wakaba kana

Everywhere
the sound of waterfalls--
tree leaves still young

Tr. Keiji Minato



遠近をちこちとうつきぬた哉
ochikochi ochikochi to utsu kinuta kana

near and far
here and there the beating sound
of fulling blocks

Tr. Gabi Greve


Fulling blocks are mallets used to beat the washing to get it dry during the Edo period.
Buson uses the Chinese characters and hiragana type of spelling words in a masterly way. this is one of the language forms of haiku that just can not be captured in a translation.



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雀子がざくざく浴る甘茶哉
suzumego ga zaku-zaku abiru amacha kana

young sparrows
showered with sweet tea
poured on baby Buddha

Tr. Chris Drake

. Tr. and comment by Chris Drake .


. WKD : Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 in Edo .


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猫洗ふざぶざぶ川や春の雨
neko arau zabu-zabu kawa ya haru no ame

splish-splash
the cat washes in the river...
spring rain




づぶ濡の仏立けりかんこ鳥
zubunure no hotoke tachi keri kankodori

Buddha stands
drenched to the bone...
mountain cuckoo




いういうと茨のおくの野梅哉
iu-iu to ibara no oku no no ume kana

cool and calm
deep in the thorn thicket...
blooming plum

Issa's iu-iu signifies yuu-yuutaru 悠々たる: quiet and calm.

Kobayashi Issa
Tr. David Lanoue


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はたはたは母が砧としられけり
hata-hata wa haha ga kinuta to shirare keri

clink-clonk
the one pounding cloth
is Mother




子宝の寝顔見へ見へ砧哉
ko-dakara no ne-gao mie mie kinuta kana

watching her treasured
child's sleeping face...
pounding cloth




Kobayashi Issa
Tr. David Lanoue

WKD : kinuta, the fulling block, pounding cloth


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kerori けろり, kerotto けろっと, kerorinkan  けろりんかん
completely unconcerned, unfazed, as if nothing had happened, just ...


名月にけろりと立しかがし哉
meigetsu ni kerori to tatashi kagashi kana

under the harvest moon
there it stands, unconcerned -
the scarecrow


Kobayashi Issa
Tr. Gabi Greve


Here is another translation by David Lanoue

in the harvest moonlight
unruffled, unaffected
scarecrow

A friend quoted this as an example for Issa, using two adjectives. But the original does not have two adjectives, but one onomatopoetic word.


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. Akimoto Fujio (1901-1977)

He used a lot of onomatopoetic words in his haiku.
Translations are in the article.


tori wataru kokikokikoki to kan kireba

raitaa no hi ga hohohoho to taki kooru

herohero to wantan susuru kurisumasu




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Related words


. WKD : Rhyme and Rhythm in Haiku .


***** WKD : Basic Haiku Theories



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12/18/2007

Buildings tall and famous

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Buildings tall and famous, skyscrapers

***** Location: Worldwide
***** Season: Non-seasonal Topic
***** Category: Humanity


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Explanation

CLICK for more skyscraper photos


To differentiate buildings and other structures that are not intended for continuous human occupancy, the latter are called non-building structures. Structural height in technical usage is the height to the highest architectural detail on building from street-level. Depending on how they are classified, spires and masts may or may not be included in this height.
Spires and masts used as antennas are not generally included.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


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Worldwide use


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Things found on the way



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Ukimido Hall and Basho's Grave


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HAIKU


The Empire State Building

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摩天楼より新緑がパセリほど
matenroo yori shinryoku ga paseri hodo

from the skyscraper
the fresh greenery of trees --
just like parsley


Takaha Shugyo, Japan (海外俳句 1969)

trans. Hoshino Tsunehiko and Adrian J. Pinnington


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no longer tallest
still, the Empire State building
by a winter moon


Roswilla


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Empire State Building lit
red white blue ---
'cause WTC is now higher


- Shared by Fred Masarani -
Joys of Japan, May 2012



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rainy winter day
distant skyscrapers
only partly there


clear winter sky
the chrysler building
points at the moon


CLICK for more photos

Larry Bole


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reflection
in a tall glass building
tall buildings


Bill Kenney, New York, 2007


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CLICK to look at more ayatori effel towers

あやとりのエッフェル塔も冬に入る
ayatori no efferutoo mo fuyu ni iru

the cat's cradle
the Eiffel Tower too
into winter


Akito Arima
trans. Emiko Miyashita and Lee Gurga,
from "Einstein's Century: Akito Arima's Haiku."


Eiffel Tower Pictures


direct paraverse by Gabi

"the Eiffel tower, which looks like an ayatori pattern, also begins the winter season"

There are many patterns for the ayatori game in Japan, but "Eiffel Tower" is a new image used by Arima sensei. Maybe he is in Paris on a dreary day in early winter and remembers the games of his childhood. ayatori is a game played inside during the long winter months. The skilfull use of the kigo brings this atmosphere of expectation of long dark months ahead.


. WKD : Arima Akito  


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CLICK for more photos


Big Ben
star in ascendance
summer sky

Noriko Yoshida (London)
published in the Asahi Haikuist Network,
8/31/2004



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Burj Khalifa is the tallest building in the world,
and the magnificent centerpiece of Downtown Dubai.


Burj Khalifa in spring
"Ladies first!" - she clicks skylobby
he B2


summer At the Top
he avoids to look closer
Burj Khalifa


Heike Gewi
Yemen

. YEMEN SAIJIKI .


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. Tokyo Sky Tree 東京スカイツリー Skytree .
Opening May 22, 2012



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Related words

. Place Names of the World and Haiku  



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Computer

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Computer and the Mouse

***** Location: Worldwide
***** Season: Non-seasonal Topic
***** Category: Humanity


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Explanation

A computer is a machine which manipulates data according to a list of instructions.



Computers take numerous physical forms. The first devices that resemble modern computers date to the mid-20th century (around 1940 - 1941), although the computer concept and various machines similar to computers existed earlier. Early electronic computers were the size of a large room, consuming as much power as several hundred modern personal computers. Modern computers are based on comparatively tiny integrated circuits and are millions to billions of times more capable while occupying a fraction of the space.

Today, simple computers may be made small enough to fit into a wrist watch and be powered from a watch battery. Personal computers in various forms are icons of the information age and are what most people think of as "a computer". However, the most common form of computer in use today is by far the embedded computer. Embedded computers are small, simple devices that are often used to control other devices—for example, they may be found in machines ranging from fighter aircraft to industrial robots, digital cameras, and even children's toys.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


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Worldwide use


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Things found on the way



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HAIKU


hot summer day--
I lean toward the computer's
cool blue start-up screen


Larry Bole, Kigo Hotline

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cat and the mouse
taking a nap -
autumn solitude

© Gabi Greve, October 2004



online ...
outside of my window
the seasons change

April 2008


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the restless patter
of a computer keyboard -
alone at midnight


Bill Kenney, New York, 2007


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winter dawn~
the cherry tree on my screen
still in blossom

Dana-Maria Onica, France


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bug-watcher
an ant comes and goes
inside his keyboard


Rosa Clement


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back on line
600 haiku
in out of the cold


Sally Evans


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winter night ...
the computer screen falls asleep
before I do


Ella Wagemakers


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Related words

*****


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12/17/2007

Pain (itami)

World Kigo TOP . ]
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Pain (itami)

***** Location: Japan
***** Season: Non-seasonal Topic
***** Category: Humanity


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Explanation

How to deal with pain ?

We all experience it at some point in our life!
Medicine can help us on a physical level, but poetry can help us on a different level to cope with it.


Now there is a book "Listen to the Voice of Pain"
Pain and Literature
by Hoka Sumio, an anaesthesist

痛みの声を聴け 
文化や文学のなかの痛みを通して考える
外須美夫
CLICK for original LINK
© www.kokuseido.co.jp


鵙鳴くや 痛みを神の 声と聞き
mozu naku ya itami o kami no koe to kiki

a gray shrike calls ...
I hear the voice of pain
as the voice of God

Masaki Kooichi 正木浩一

Koichi wrote this haiku shortly before his death from cancer.
He came from a family of haiku poets and used to write to make the pain more bearable.
His sister is teaching haiku at NHK HAIKU in 2007/2008.
quote from mukago3

CLICK for more MOZU bird photos
Mozu, the shrike, butcher-bird


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Worldwide use


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Things found on the way



蚤虱 馬の 尿 する枕もと
nomi shirami uma no bari suru makuramoto

fleas and lice
and a horse pissing
next to my pillow


Matsuo Basho
(Tr. Gabi Greve)

Most translators of this haiku interpolate some feeling of disgust.

That is not what Basho said or meant at all, for he was using that suffering; he was not used by it. Not a single syllable in his original words reflects self-pity. It was just Nip! Ouch! Pshhh!

How does one understand suffering?
Our practice in the Diamond Sutra is not easy. But if there are the tears of sincere pain, they carry precious virtue. Self-pity sullies this virtue, and when self-pity is projected, we have needless dissension in the sangha, the community. The virtue itself shines forth with incisive spirit that drives through the darkness. The pain itself is just that pain.

© Henro Tracks, a Basho Bash
Henro Tracks discusses pain in the haiku of Basho.

WKD: Fleas and Lice


The siluhette of Matsuo basho and this haiku !
Miyagi perfecture, Naruko Hot Spring, 2011
. Rice Field Art 田んぼアート  tanbo aato .


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HAIKU


秋の蚊の痛み軽しと腕を見る
aki no ka no itami karushi to ude o miru

the little pain caused
by this mosquito in autumn -
I look at my hand


While Noji san was sitting at his computer, this mosquito swirrled around his head for a while and then landed on his right hand, which held the mouse. He looked at it for a while and then ... slap.
© nojisan.no-blog.jp


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CLICK for more photos


手のひらの痛み温みや鬼胡桃
te no hira no itami nukumi ya oni gurumi

the pain in my palm
feels warm now -
large walnuts


She was gripping these nuts in her hand firmly, until the pain changed into a pleasant warmth.
© Tomiko とみ子

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Related words

***** Dead body, deceased person, corpse (hotoke) Japan
Death Poems, Death Haiku


***** Emotions and feelings expressed in haiku
... Loneliness, sadness, melancholy and other emotions
Sabishisa, kanashisa and more


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12/05/2007

Tree (ki, jumoku) and forest

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Tree (ki, jumoku) and Forest

***** Location: Japan
***** Season: Non-seasonal Topic and see below
***** Category: Plant


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Explanation



tree, ki, jumoku 木, 樹
small forest, hayashi, rin 林
grove, kodachi 木立

forest, mori 森
..... shinrin 森林


Green young leaves, wakaba, are for all trees, but some with especially pretty ones have their own kigo.
... Green young leaves

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CLICK for more photos !CLICK for more photos of famous trees


Famous tree, meiboku 名木
(do not mix with "meiboku" 銘木, wood suitable for processing)

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CLICK for many more !CLICK for many more beautiful photos !

The 100 most famous trees of Japan
meiboku hyakusen 名木百選

Each prefecture then has its own choice of famous trees.

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CLICK for more photos !

One single cherry tree, ippon sakura 一本桜
Japanese are most fond of these lone trees !

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CLICK for more Yakusugi CLICK for more Yaku Sugi

Cedar trees from Yakushima Island,
many are more than a few thousand years old fro the Jomon period
Jomon sugi (joomon sugi) 縄文杉
Yakusugi 屋久杉, Yakushima Sugi

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Old Tree, koboku 古木

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CLICK for more photos !CLICK for more photos !


Sacred tree, "Tree of a Deity", shinboku 神木
Usually in a Shinto shrine.
"honorable sacred tree", go shinboku 御神木

. shinboku 神木, shinju 神樹 sacred tree divine tree .
and haiku

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Cedar of Kannon Bosatsu, Kannon Sugi, 観音杉


. Karasaki no Matsu 唐崎の松 / 辛崎の松 Black Japanese pine at Karasaki (Lake Biwa)
One of the three most famous pines and haiku

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CLICK for more photos

yashikirin 屋敷林 ( やしきりん ) trees around a home
yashikibayashi, manor house forest

In many of the large planes facing the Sea of Japan, the winter winds are quite fierce and strong trees around an isolated homestead protect the houses. The small forests also provide good wood for building a house. The fallen leaves give firewood and compost. Many birds nest in special trees planted for them, leaving their droppings, which in turn provide new plants growing below the trees. Bigger trees on the outside protect fruit trees on the inside, providing food for the winter months.
Local varieties in the form of these small forests show the aesthetic feeling of an area.
In the plains around Izumo, for example, they take the shape of the roof of the Grand Shrine of Izumo.


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Compiled by Larry Bole :

William J. Higginson says on the topic of "tree" as kigo
(from "Haiku World"):

"The names of many trees suggest their blossoms or fruit which are often seasonal. But the evergreens and cedar and the names alone of many deciduous trees such as oak and birch, do not have particular seasonal assocations. ..."

Higginson then goes on to point out two specific exceptions to the observaton that "the names alone of many deciduous trees do not have particular seasonal associations," namely the maple (kaede, momiji, late autumn) and the willow (yanagi, late spring).

Young American beech trees (Fagus Grandifolia) keep their autumn leaves (golden brown) all winter. This makes them relatively unique among deciduous trees.
Could this aspect of a young American beech tree be a winter kigo?


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Tamamura Kōzaburō (1856 - 1923)

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Kigo in various seasons

. Acacia (akashia) locust tree .
Akazie

. Beech tree (buna 山毛欅 ).
Fagus sylvatica. Buche

Birch tree (shirakaba 白樺) Birke
Betula mandschurica var. japonica — Japanese birch
Betula grossa — Japanese cherry birch

. Cryptomeria (sugi 杉)  
Cryptomeria japonica. Japanische Zeder

. Gingko biloba, ichoo,ichō 銀杏 Icho, Itcho .

. Hemp palm, hemp-palm (shuro 棕櫚) .
Trachycarpus fortunei. Hanfpalme

. Hinoki cypress ヒノキ、檜、桧.
Chamaecyparis obtusa
ーーーーー and
asunaro hinoki アスナロ / 翌檜 Asunaro Hinoki
Thujopsis dolabrata


. Magnolia (mokuren) and other kinds .

. Nettletree, Chinese hackberry tree (enoki 榎).
Celtis sinensis var. japonica. Chinese) hackberry
chinesischer Zürgelbaum

. Pagoda tree (enju えんじゅ【槐】) .
Styphnolobium japonicum, Sophora japonica
japanischer Schnurbaum

. Tamarack tree, Larch (karamatsu 唐松) .
Larix kaempferi (Lambert) Carriere. Lärche
Hackmatack - The American larch (Larix Americana)
. . . . . Spruce tree, Fichte
genus Picea

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Some kigo include the Chinese characters for
tree and forest given above

. Leaves of trees in all seasons .

kigo for spring
here GROVE means a grove with trees in full bloom

plum grove, bairin 梅林(ばいりん)

peach grove, toorin 桃林(とうりん)

CLICK for more peach grove photos


grove in spring, shunrin 春林 しゅんりん
tree in spring, haru no ki 春の樹(はるのき)
forest in spring, haru no mori 春の森(はるのもり)

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kigo for early spring

. hinoki ochiba 檜落葉(ひのきおちば)
fallen leaves of the Japanese cypress .

Chamaecyparis obtusa

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kigo for mid-spring

hannoki no hana, han no ki no hana 赤楊の花 (はんのきのはな)
alder tree blossoms
..... han no hana 榛の花(はんのはな)
hari no ki no hana , harinoki no hana はりの木の花(はりのきのはな)

hashibami no hana 榛の花 (はしばみのはな) hazle tree blossoms

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kigo for late spring

azusa no hana 梓の花 (あずさのはな) catalpa tree blossoms
..... hana azusa 花梓(はなあずさ)
yogusominebari no hana よぐそみねばりの花(よぐそみねばりのはな)


kaede no hana 楓の花 (かえでのはな) maple tree blossoms
..... hana kaede 花楓(はなかえで)
momiji saku もみじ咲く(もみじさく)"red leaved treees have blossoms"

kashi no hana 樫の花 (かしのはな) oak tree blossoms

kaya no hana 榧の花 (かやのはな) torreya tree blossoms

kibushi no hana 木五倍子の花 (きぶしのはな)
Stachyurus praecox

kuromoji no hana 黒文字の花 (くろもじのはな ) spice bush blossoms
Lindera umbellata. Fieberstrauch

. 雨城楊枝 "toothpicks from the Rain Castle". .
made from Kuromoji wood !

yamamomo no hana 楊梅の花 (やまもものはな)
bayberry blossoms Myrica rubra

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kigo for all summer

"new tree" shinju 新樹 (しんじゅ)

. tsuge ochiba 黄楊落葉(つげおちば)
fallen leaves of boxwood .

early summer

. silk tree flowers, nemu no hana 合歓の花 (ねむのはな)  
..... nebu no hana ねぶのはな
hana nemu 花合歓 blossoming silk tree
"persian carpet flower tree" juuka ju
絨花樹(じゅうかじゅ)
..... nemuri gi ねむり木(ねむりぎ)
gookon 合昏(ごうこん)
Albizia julibrissin.
.... and kigo in other seasons

Crape myrtle (sarusuberi)
kusuguri no ki くすぐりの木(くすぐりのき)

Japanese wax tree, roo no ki 蝋の木(ろうのき)
..... haji no ki はじの木(はじのき)
The rhus tree (haze) as kigo
Rhus succedanea (Japanese wax tree)

grove in summer, natsu kodachi 夏木立 (なつこだち)
tree in summer, natsuki 夏木(なつき)

. konoshita yami 木下闇 (このしたやみ) darkness under the trees .
ko no kure 木の晩(このくれ)dusk under trees
..... kogure 木暮(こぐれ)
ko no kuregakuri 木の暗隠り(このくれがくり)
konokureshige 木の暗茂(このくれしげ)
koguru 木暮る(こぐる), kogurashi 木暗し(こぐらし)

. morin 茂林(もりん)forest with thick leaves .
shigeri 茂 - 繁り (しげり) leaves grow thick
musubiba 結葉 (むすびば)

ryokuin 緑蔭 (りょくいん) shadow of trees

aogiri 梧桐 (あおぎり) Chinese parasol tree
..... 青桐(あおぎり)、gotoo 梧桐(ごとう)
Firmiana platanifolia

nezumimochi no hana 女貞の花 (ねずみもちのはな)
blossoms of Ligustrum japonicum

tobera no hana 海桐の花 (とべらのは)
blossoms of Pittosporum tobira 扉木
..... hana tobera 花とべら(はなとべら)

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kigo for late summer

doyoo me 土用芽 (どようめ) buds on the dog day
..... doyoo no me 土用の芽(どようのめ)

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. Trees blossoming in Summer - LIST .

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kigo for autumn

"red tree" kooju 紅樹(こうじゅ)

. red leaves, colored leaves, momiji (kooyoo 紅葉) .
urushi momiji 漆紅葉(うるしもみじ)momiji of the laquer tree
..... nurude momiji 白膠紅葉(ぬるでもみじ)

haze momiji 櫨紅葉(はぜもみじ)momiji of the wax tree
ichoo momiji 銀杏黄葉(いちょうもみじ)momiji of the gingko tree

kashiwa mojimi 柏黄葉(かしわもみじ)momiji of the Kashiwa oak
kaki momiji 柿紅葉(かきもみじ)momiji of the persimmon tree
ume momiji 梅紅葉(うめもみじ)momiji of the plum tree
nemu momiji 合歓紅葉(ねむもみじ)momiji of the mimosa tree

toodan momiji 満天星紅葉(どうだんもみじ)
momiji of Enkianthus perulatus

budoo momiji 葡萄紅葉(ぶどうもみじ)momiji of grapes
shirakaba momiji 白樺黄葉(しらかばもみじ)momiji of the birch tree

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kenbonashi 枳梖 (けんぽなし) Hovenia dulcis
..... genbonashi 玄圃梨(げんぽなし)
..... tenboonashi てんぽうなし
Hovenia dulcis. Japanischer Rosinenbaum
Its fruit is used in Chinese medicine.

Legend from Aichi, 豊田市 Toyota
kenbonashi no ki けんぼなしの木 Kenponashi, Hovenia dulcis
Once the temple 薬師寺 Yakushi-Ji burned down. The hanshoo 半鐘 fire bell survived the flames and was burried in the ground. On this spot a Kenponashi tree was planted.
This tree grew very large and soon became a nuisance to the nearby farmers. So one cut some of its branches. but he became very ill after that.
. Yakushi Nyorai 薬師如来 and legends from Aichi .

kisasage 木豇豆 (きささげ ) Catalpa ovata
..... hisagi 楸(ひさぎ)
Catalpa ovata. japanischer Trompetenbaum; japanische Katalpa


. Autumn leaves, red leaves (momiji)  

. Oak trees of Japan (Quercus) and acorns (donguri)  

. Nuts and fruits of trees (konomi)  

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kigo for late autumn

sangoju 珊瑚樹 (さんごじゅ) "tree like a coral"
Viburnum

..... kisango きさんご
Viburnum odoratissimum var. awabuki. サンゴジュ
With bright red berries.
. . . . . but

sangoju no hana 珊瑚樹の花 (さんごじゅのはな)
..... hana sango 晩夏 花珊瑚(はなさんご)
kigo for late summer

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kigo for winter

CLICK for more photos !
frost on the forest, muhyoorin 霧氷林(むひょうりん)
... juhyoorin 樹氷林(じゅひょうりん)



. fallen leaves, ochiba 落葉 おちば  
withered leaves, kareha 枯葉 (かれは)
and many more

. keyaki karu 欅枯る(けやきかる)withering zelkova tree .


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Worldwide use

Arbor Day - April 10
observance kigo for spring in the USA



Arbor Day (from the Latin arbor, meaning tree)
is a holiday in which individuals and groups are encouraged to plant and care for trees. It originated in Nebraska City, Nebraska, United States by J. Sterling Morton. The first Arbor Day was held on April 10, 1872, and an estimated one million trees were planted that day.

Many countries now observe a similar holiday. Though usually observed in the spring, the date varies, depending on climate and suitable planting season.

Birdsey Northrop of Connecticut was responsible for globalizing it when he visited Japan in 1883 and delivered his Arbor Day and Village Improvement message. In that same year, the American Forestry Association made Northrop the Chairman of the committee to campaign for Arbor Day nationwide. He also brought his enthusiasm for Arbor Day to Australia, Canada and Europe.

Arbor Day reached its height of popularity on its 125th anniversary in 1997, when David J. Wright, noticed that a Nebraska nonprofit organization called the National Arbor Day Foundation had taken the name of the holiday and commercialized it for their own use as a trademark for their publication "Arbor Day," so he countered their efforts, launched a website, and trademarked it for "public use celebrations" and defended the matter in a federal district court in the United States[2] to ensure it was judged as property of the public domain, the case was settled in October 1999. Today anyone can use the term "Arbor Day" as well as hold their own Arbor Day celebration.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


Japan celebrates a similarly themed Greenery Day, held on May 4.
Although it has a similar theme to Arbor Day, its roots lay in celebration of the birthday of Emperor Hirohito.

. Green Week (midori no shuukan 緑の週間) .
Greenery Day (みどりの日, midori no hi)


. WKD : World Days as Kigo .

arbor day -
the boy plants a pencil
beside the sand castle


Gabi Greve

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Baum, Bäume
Hain / Wald, Wälder


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Things found on the way


The Mandala Tree at the Mandala Temple


Trees, my best friends .. 巨木

................................ Camphor Tree Kusunoki 楠木 くすのき

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. Kodama 木霊 - 木魂  The Tree Spirit .

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HAIKU




sacred gingko tree -
a prayer falls
with every leaf


 © Gabi Greve, Japan 2007

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useless tree -
too old to move,
I just sit here


Gabi Greve
Tao of a useless tree  

More OLD TREE, koboku photos


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動く葉もなくおそろしき夏木立
ugoku ha mo naku osoroshiki natsu kodachi

Even leaves don't move
Awsome is the
Summer grove

Tr. Dr. Satya Bhushan Verma


Buson or Basho ?

- Reference -

It is not listed in the complete works of Matsuo Basho.

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屋敷林の奥あたたかし三輪車
yashikirin no oku atatakashi sanrinsha

the manor house forest
is warm deep inside -
a tricycle

Taniguchi Michiru 谷口みちる

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夏の月滝田栄の林立す
natsu no tsuki Takita Sakae no hayashi tatsu

summer moon . . .
I stand in the forest
of Takita Sakae

Hitotsu Maguro 一鮪
http://www.koshinfu.com/007.html


Takita Sakae 滝田栄 and his woodwork statues

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quoting Chuang-Tsu - Zhuangzi, Sooshi 荘子
Free and Easy Wandering


"What can I do with an old tree?"

"Why don't you plant it in Not-Even-Anything Village,
or the field of Broad-and-Boundless,
relax and do nothing by its side,
or lie down for a free and easy sleep under it?
Axes will never shorten its life, nothing can ever harm it.
If there's no use for it, how can it come to grief or pain?"



. Chinese background of Japanese kigo .


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Related words

. Cottonwood (Populus deltoides, Populus fremontii) . USA

***** World Kigo Database
search for TREE ! Leaves, Blossoms, names of fruit ...

. Forest work ... in all seasons  

. WASHOKU - Food from the Bountiful Woods
(Mori no Megumi)


. Food from the Sea, Food from the Mountains
Umi no Sachi, Yama no Sachi ... The Origin

. PLANTS - - - the Complete SAIJIKI .  
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